1826 Great Britain One Penny King George IV PCGS AU58

$495.00

A quite near Brilliant Uncirculated specimen, and probably nicer than most coins graded 60-62. Not many exist in this state of preservation. The current Krause catalog says $375 in XF40 and $975 in MS60.

 

 

Categories: ,

Description

The Coin: A quite near Brilliant Uncirculated specimen, and probably nicer than most coins graded 60-62. Not many exist in this state of preservation. The current Krause catalog says $375 in XF40 and $975 in MS60.

18.8 Grams, 34 Millimeters, Copper. Mintage: 5,914,000.

“Standard Catalog of English and UK Coins” by Coincraft. #G41D-015.

“Standard Catalog of World Coins” (1801-1900) by Krause-Mishler. #693.

Obverse: GEORGIUS IV DEI GRATIA • 1826 • George IV by the grace of God. • The William Wyon portrait.

Reverse: BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: King of the British Territories and Defender of the Faith • Britannia, seated right, holding shield emblazoned with the Union Jack and trident. Rose, Thistle and Shamrock in exergue.

Note: Even though it has been professionally graded, that is only an opinion, and as grading is subjective, please see the pictures and judge for yourself.

This is a very nice, large “One Penny” from Great Britain. It has been professionally graded and authenticated by the most prestigious third party grading firm, the “Professional Coin Grading Service” or PCGS, as Almost Uncirculated or AU58.

In 1825 it became necessary to strike copper Pennys again as the last had been struck in 1806. The King was very displeased with his current portrait which had been designed by Benedetto Pistrucci, the Italian born gem engraver who was chief engraver at the mint. He designed the famous and beautiful Saint George & the Dragon” that is still used on British coins today. The mint had William Wyon redesign the portrait, this one, and it first appeared on the Penny in very late 1825.

Collecting Pennys: There are only three dates of George IV Pennys, all have this obverse. The 1825 is quite scarce because the mint did not start striking them until November 14 or later. And as the 1827 is particularly rare, both dates carry premiums. The 1826 here is somewhat more common but not in high grade, as here. To quote the Coincraft catalog: “Brilliant Uncirculated specimens are very rare.”

Collecting Britannia: “Britannia” has been on coins since the Roman Emperor Hadrian first placed her there about the time he was building his famous wall across England, circa 120 AD. The first “English” depiction of their “National Lady” was on the 1672 Farthings and Halfpennies of King Charles II. This was the second year of this long-lived type, she remained essentially the same through the remainder of the reign of George IV, William IV and with the change of REX to REG until 1860 during the reign of Victoria when she was redesigned for the Bronze coinage of 1860.

There are three minor varieties of 1826 George IV “Britannias”. The differences are in the lines in the Saltire (diagonal stripes) in the Union Jack on the shield. This one has no line in the middle and as such is type 1.

GEORGE: His charm and culture earned George IV the title “The First Gentleman of England”, but his bad relations with his father and wife, and his dissolute way of life earned him the contempt of the people and dimmed the prestige of the monarchy. Taxpayers were angry at his wasteful spending in time of war (against Napoleon). He did not provide national leadership in time of crisis, nor a role model for his people. His ministers found his behavior selfish, unreliable, and irresponsible. At all times he was much under the influence of favorites.

When his father, George III, died and “The Regent” George IV held his Coronation, His wife, Queen Caroline, was not allowed into Westminster Abbey, even though she did try to enter. “I don’t care if you are the Queen, You can’t come in!”.